September 22, 2014

Cynthia Woods Keel is Found

Contact: Frank Griffis or Rod Davis regarding the investigation
(979) 458-6023,
frank.griffis@tamu.edu,
rodneydavis@tamu.edu;
Griffis cell: (979) 571-9877
Davis cell: (979) 587-2778


GALVESTON, Texas – Texas A&M University System officials investigating the sinking of the Cynthia Woods Thursday reported that the sailing vessel’s keel had been found in 113 feet of water 32 miles off Freeport in the Gulf of Mexico.  The announcement was made by Jay Kimbrough, deputy chancellor and general counsel of the A&M System.

Kimbrough said that he was notified shortly after noon that the recovery team had found the keel in four feet of mud and planned to videotape the object on the sea floor before recovery attempts.  The team had discovered an object that it suspected was the keel Wednesday night and on Thursday used underwater acoustic equipment to relocate it and walked a diver straight to the location.  The recovery team contacted the U.S. Coast Guard and will be working with their investigators on the recovery and inspection of the keel.

The 38-foot Cynthia Woods capsized on the night of June 6 in the Gulf of Mexico while competing in the Regata de Amigos, a sailing race from Galveston to Veracruz, Mexico.  A Coast Guard helicopter rescued five members of the Texas A&M University at Galveston Offshore Sailing Team early on June 8 reportedly 27 miles off the Texas coast near Freeport.  The body of the sixth crew member, safety officer Roger Stone, was found that afternoon, and funeral services were held on June 12.

About the A&M System
The A&M System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $2.9 billion. Through a statewide network of nine universities, seven state agencies and a comprehensive health science center, the A&M System educates more than 106,000 students and makes more than 15 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. Externally funded research brings in almost $627 million every year and helps drive the state’s economy.